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Mosquitoes

Do you have a mosquito problem? Mosquito season starts in the spring when the weather gets warm and runs through fall throughout most of North America.

No one enjoys the itchy bites or the constant swatting of mosquitoes. Due to the spread of mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile Virus, Chikungunya, and Dengue Fever, the concern over mosquitoes has continued to rise.

Take back your yard by calling your local Rentokil Steritech office and ask about our mosquito control and prevention service.

To speak with an expert about our mosquito control solutions, call 1-877-690-2115 or contact us online.

Mosquito Fact: Mosquitoes are horrible fliers and only fly at about 1 to 1.5 miles an hour. Nearly every single other flying insect, even butterflies, would beat mosquitoes in a flying race.

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How Rentokil Steritech controls mosquitoes

Mosquitoes love to find cool, damp places to rest during the day. Their primary feeding times are dusk and dawn and that means they like hiding in mulch, low lying vegetation, low limbs on trees and other shady places.

Our licensed and trained Technicians will seek out the most likely places on your property where mosquitoes might be hiding.

The Technician will create a barrier, coating vegetation surrounding your home, and other likely hiding places, with a treatment that will kill the adults when they touch those places. This barrier can last months, but does require regular re-applications.

Your Technician will also advise you on things you can do around your property to prevent future infestations like cutting back vegetation and removing standing water.

Mosquito bites: how to avoid them

Mosquitoes can really put a damper on your summer evening and early morning activities especially if you love to be outdoors. Mosquito bites, at the very least, are itchy and irritating. Throw in the concerns over disease, it is becoming increasingly important to avoid mosquito bites.

One of the best ways to find mosquito bite relief is to avoid them altogether. Stay inside during dawn and dusk hours.

If you do go outside, wear long pants and long sleeved shirts that cover as much skin as possible. Mosquitoes can detect bare skin and sense carbon dioxide exhaled from animals and people up to 23 meters away.

Use screens with very tiny holes on all windows and open doorways. These will prevent flying insects from coming inside.

Use a bug repellent that uses the chemical DEET which has been proven highly effective in repelling mosquitoes.

Use fans indoors or on porches and decks. Since mosquitoes are terrible fliers, the turbulent air keeps them away from your area.

You should also routinely remove standing water on your property since mosquito larvae can only hatch in water. Their life cycle is very quick, and some species can breed in puddles left by rain storms. Fill in open holes in trees and tree stumps that can collect water.

Use repellents like citronella or plant citronella grass in your yard. This is a powerful repellant, but remember to crush the grass leaves to release the chemicals that are effective.

Mosquito diseases

Did you know that the tiny mosquito is actually the deadliest killer in the animal kingdom? It’s true.

Mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile Virus have been a major concern in North America.

There is no part of the world where you cannot find mosquitoes other than the frozen continent of Antarctica. Mosquitoes can transmit disease bite after bite and are one of the leading distributors of a number of diseases, many of them deadly to both people and pets.

Some common mosquito-borne illnesses are:

  • West Nile Virus

  • St. Louis Encephalitis

  • La Crosse Encephalitis

  • Japanese encephalitis

  • Western equine encephalitis

  • Eastern equine encephalitis or sleeping sickness

  • Malaria

  • Dengue fever

  • Yellow fever

  • Rift Valley fever

  • Canine Heartworm

  • Chikungunya Virus

Mosquito bites

One of the best ways to find mosquito bite relief is to avoid them altogether. Stay inside during dawn and dusk hours.

If you do go outside, wear long pants and long sleeved shirts that cover as much skin as possible. Mosquitoes can detect bare skin and sense carbon dioxide exhaled from animals and people up to 23 meters away.

Use screens with very tiny holes on all windows and open doorways. These will prevent flying insects from coming inside.

Use a bug repellent that uses the chemical DEET which has been proven highly effective in repelling mosquitoes.

Use fans indoors or on porches and decks. Since mosquitoes are terrible fliers, the turbulent air keeps them away from your area.

You should also routinely remove standing water on your property since mosquito larvae can only hatch in water. Their life cycle is very quick, and some species can breed in puddles left by rain storms. Fill in open holes in trees and tree stumps that can collect water.

Use repellents like citronella or plant citronella grass in your yard. This is a powerful repellant, but remember to crush the grass leaves to release the chemicals that are effective.

Although most mosquito bites are harmless and do not carry the risk of serious illnesses, Canada has seen a dramatic increase in annual reports of mosquito-borne diseases. In particular these include viruses spread by certain mosquito species like West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis.

A person’s chance of becoming ill from a single mosquito bite remains relatively low. Nevertheless, you should always ensure that you take the appropriate steps necessary to prevent mosquitoes from biting you and your family thus reducing the risks in being infected by a serious vector-borne disease.

Common symptoms

  • Itchy Red Bumps - Visible red bumps that are itchy and that appear on the surface of your skin after a female mosquito has punctured the skin with her thin proboscis to feed on your blood in order to use the protein from the blood to produce eggs.
  • Swelling - A mosquito’s saliva contains proteins, digestive enzymes and an anticoagulant that prevents our blood from clotting. The protein in their saliva provokes an immune response from your body, namely the redness, swelling and bump, which is what makes a mosquito bite itch so much.

Why do mosquito bites itch?

Have you ever wondered why mosquito bites itch? When you're bitten by a mosquito, your body reacts by producing histamine to fight the bite. The histamine causes a bump to form in the affected area which irritates nerves, causing an itchy feeling. 

How to get rid of mosquitoes bites

Reaction to bites will vary from person to person. Symptoms that develop are just our immune system’s response to their saliva. Mosquitoes don’t actually inject anything into us when they bite.

  • Clean the wound - this is the most important treatment for a mosquito or midge bite.
  • Use an ice pack - swelling can be reduced immediately after a bite by covering it with an ice pack (but never hold ice directly on the skin). It may take more than a week to go down and may remain itchy for several days.
  • Take antihistamines - itchiness and swelling can be relieved with antihistamine creams for bites and stings. Oral antihistamine can also help especially if you have multiple bites.
  • Do not scratch - avoid scratching as this will increase the itch and could lead to the bite becoming infected by bacteria.

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